David “headChopper” Kaplen

Daily Archives

print article archives RSS

How to Build a CFB Roster

Thursday, September 22, 2016


College football is a fast-rising daily fantasy sport that most everyone who plays falls in love with. It’s a mix of the NFL and the NBA on PEDs. The scoring is furious, and the action never lets up.
 

What’s really great about the sport, though, is that when you pay for a stud, you normally get a stud performance. That’s where the NBA similarities come in. When you pay up for Kevin Durant or LeBron James, its usually not a question of “if” they are going to produce, but rather a matter of just how much they are going to go off.
 

With that in mind, let’s take a look at the positions and how to best assess their value with various strategies, stats and fantasy college football research tools.
 

Quarterback


This is where you should be spending the most money. You cannot go cheap at QB in college. In the NFL, there is somewhat of a limit to production. Most NFL teams don’t exceed four TDS in a week, and you’re lucky if it all comes from the QB. In college, that cap is much higher. Teams scoring eight or nine TDs is routine against the right competition, and the QB can account for a large piece of the production.
 

What you’re looking for in college is a system, as opposed to a QB. Think Mike Leach or Kevin Sumlin, whose systems constantly churn out huge fantasy producers. Connor Halliday is the QB at Washington State, the team Leach coaches. Halliday is an average QB that probably will have a tough time making an NFL roster. Yet, in Leach’s system he averages a whopping 478 yards and four TDs per game. Become accustomed to the QB-friendly systems so that you’re playing the best fantasy players and not just the biggest college names. System QBs are gold in college. Think Halliday, Davis Webb and Jared Goff.
 

From a personal standpoint, I love running QBs. Quarterbacks that run in college aren’t like the ones that run in the NFL. Let’s remember Michael Vick when he was in his fantasy prime and the uproar he created by running in the NFL. It practically led to him being drafted number one overall in season-long leagues. Now multiply that by 10 and you get the fantasy greatness of a running QB in college. Watching a quarterback churning out those points at a much higher clip with his running ability is a phenomenal feeling.  One-hundred-yard rushing games are routine in college, and those rushing TDs are a solid two extra points each time. Those additional points add up to create fantasy monsters with regards to the final stat line. Running QBs are something to look for each week. Think Dak Prescott, Nick Marshall and Marquise Williams.
 

Running Back
 

Similar to the NFL game, this is where your next batch of salary should go. However, unlike the NFL game, college RBs are consistent and usually pay off their price tags. How many times have you spent big money on LeSean McCoy or Marshawn Lynch only to have them end up with a disappointing 60 yards and zero TDs?
 

As a rule of thumb in the college game, when you take studs it’s usually not “if” but rather “how high” they’re going to score. Melvin Gordon has played six games this year. He was injured in one of them and finished with a subpar output. In the other five matchups, he’s averaged well over 35 fantasy points per game, and this is with basically the same scoring as the NFL. Stud college running backs usually hit their mark most weeks, regardless of matchup. Think Gordon, Tevin Coleman and Ameer Abdullah.
 

Wide Receiver
 

Wide receivers are the next group you need to look at. First off, let’s be clear in saying that you do not need to handcuff a WR with a QB in college to gain those extra points. Quarterbacks stand alone, and it’s no different with wide receivers.
 

Once again, I go back to the “system” statement from earlier. Look for those systems that produce big WR statistical performances. There are offensive schemes that do nothing but funnel the ball to a particular WR on a team. A guy like Amari Cooper of Alabama will get an ungodly amount of targets in a game. In the NFL, we look at around nine targets per game as being a benchmark for a great WR play. As we can see in RotoGrinders’ advanced WR research tool, in college, the studs get upwards of 14 targets per game on average.
 

When choosing a WR, be aware of the CFB Vegas odds. You want to maintain some distance from WRs in games that have blowout spreads listed. In college, we oftentimes get games with 30+ point spreads, and that’s just not what we want to see when choosing a productive WR. Look for games with lower spreads that could possibly transform into shootouts.
 

Unlike the QB position though, a lot of the WR fantasy studs in college will be playing on Sundays in the NFL. The top-level guys who are bigger and faster just outrun and outmuscle the mediocre defenders at this level. Therefore, name recognition is a good thing to follow. Think Cooper, Kevin White and Jaelen Strong.
 

Tight End
 

This is an easy one for me. In college, it’s a solid idea to punt your tight end spot. By punt I mean find the cheapest guy you can that has an opportunity at a touchdown or a decent amount of yards. In years past, there have been studs coming up through college like Jace Amaro, Dwayne Allen and Eric Ebron, but at this point in time those types of standout players don’t exist in the CFB game. Therefore, it’s a good rule of thumb to never over-exert salary on this position. Think anyone that’s not expensive.



David “headChopper” Kaplen is one of the godfathers of Daily Fantasy, having been near the top of the rankings since DFS emerged in 2010. Nearing double-digit live final qualifiers, David’s crowning achievement is winning the 2013 FanDuel Basketball Champion in Las Vegas. HeadChopper can be found on twitter @headChopper.



Highest Searched Players over the last 7 days



Video Center

  •  
    Dose: Raiders Win Thriller

    Dose: Raiders Win Thriller
  •  
    RotoPat: Week 7 Rankings

    RotoPat: Week 7 Rankings
  •  
    Dose: Diggs Not Practicing

    Dose: Diggs Not Practicing
  •  
    Power Rankings: Saints Rise

    Power Rankings: Saints Rise
  •  
    Waivers: Top Dallas RB?

    Waivers: Top Dallas RB?
  •  
    Dose: Mariota Wins in Return

    Dose: Mariota Wins in Return
  •  
    Dose: Vintage Peterson

    Dose: Vintage Peterson
  •  
    Silva: Week 6 Matchups

    Silva: Week 6 Matchups