Glenn Colton

Week That Was

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Fred Who? Barney is the Man!

Saturday, May 14, 2011


Barney continues to star while Dustin Moseley's success looks more like Dust in the Wind. A look at those stories and more in this week's Week That Was.


Darwin Barney: Darwin Barney just keeps on keepin' on. The Cubbies second sacker tallied another three hits and three RBI on Friday. For the season, the surprise starter is raking at .326 clip with 22 runs, 17 RBI and a couple of swipes. It is performances like these – ones that seemingly come out of nowhere – that lead to roto titles. So, was this foreseeable? Actually, yes. In 2009, Barney hit .318 at AA. In 2010, he hit .299 at AAA. So there clearly was a track record of hitting for average. The only question was whether he would get a chance to play. Once that was announced, owners should have pounced. If he is available in your NL only league, grab him.


Dustin Moseley: Dustin Moseley's magical carpet ride seems to have crash landed. Moseley got tattooed last night, giving up six runs, nine hits and two walks in just four innings. Ok, say it with me – SELL!! Sell while the ERA sits at a strong 3.40. Moseley simply is nothing special. He will bounce around the majors for a number of years still and will even post a few good starts here and there. However, even Petco cannot convert ehhh to ahhh. San Diego has a number of younger, more talented arms they should be trying out. That will happen sooner rather than later. Crow about how Petco makes scrub pitchers stars, highlight the 3.40 ERA and sell while the window is still open. It will not be for long.


Fernando Martinez: Fernando Martinez got himself noticed last night by coming off the bench and going yard. Those in keeper leagues who haven't taken notice, you should. Martinez, despite seeming to have been around forever, is just 22 and not even at the age where players make the show. The talent is there and it will come out. So, if you can store him on reserve, do it. For those of you in one year NL only leagues, is it hard to see the Mets dealing Beltran (or Beltran getting hurt)? Is it hard to fathom that Angel Pagan really isn't Rickey Henderson? Do you really think that Jason Pridie is the answer? I think you get the point – there will be opportunity for FMart in the second half. Speculate on the cheap now.


Doug Fister: Doug Fister was awesome last night, giving up just four hits and two runs over eight innings against Schultz's red hot Indians. I have to admit it, when my NFBC partner, ESPN's own Nate Ravitz, extolled the virtues of Fister, I was, to say the least, dismissive. Ok, I will say it outright – you were right Nate! Seriously, I am starting to see that Fister is more than just a pitcher taking advantage of a cavernous park. With a 33/13 k/bb and an ERA of 3.22, Fister could help a lot of teams. The k/bb is not a fluke as he posted a 93/32 last year and 79/11 in AAA in 2009. With that key indicator locked down and 5 of the last 7 starts being quite strong, Fister has become a buy in my book.


Justin Duchscherer: Justin Duchscherer has finally toed the rubber in a real game – albeit an extended spring training game. According to reports right here at Rotoworld, the Duch threw 23 of his 26 pitches for strikes. Given that control is the toughest thing for a pitcher to get back after injury this is a big sign. Yes, Duch is always hurt and yes, the Orioles will be cautious. However, if you are in a deep league, you could do a lot worse than speculating on the Duch. After all, when he is on the mound, he is really pretty good. His career numbers show an almost 3/1 K/BB, an ERA of 3.13 and a WHIP of 1.14. Who couldn't use stats like that in the second half?


Ian Stewart: Ian Stewart's nightmare season continued as the Rockies shipped him back to the minors. You can hardly blame the team as Stewart is hitting an truly atrocious .064. So, what are the roto-effects? First, look for Ty Wigginton to get a lot of PT and put up classic Wiggy numbers (20+ HR and decent counting numbers). Also, it is time to cut bait on Stewart unless you have a huge reserve and can stash him. He has never hit .260 or better in the bigs and strikes out a ton. There simply are no signs that Ian will bounce back any time soon.


Andres Torres: Andres Torres had a big day Friday, going 3-5 with a triple and a swipe. Since coming off of the shelf, Torres is 7-15, so obviously, he will play and needs to be active in all formats. However, he is a player with major risk. The Giants have outfielders all over the place, so they do not need to be patient if Torres hits a slump. Also, Torres is one of those players who had his career breakout year at 32 – rarely a sign of long term success. So, if you own Andres, now is the time to sell. Market away.


Scott Rolen: Scott Rolen came off the DL Friday. The question now becomes which Scott Rolen will show up? Will the Reds get the guy who was hitting .217 before getting hurt or the guy who .284 with 20 HR last year. Honestly, I just do not know. However, I do know that I avoid older injury prone players unless the price is bargain basement. If I owned Rolen, I would wait for a couple of good games and then sell. My gut says this will be a frustrating injury-filled year for the Reds vet.


Delmon Young: The light hitting twins got a boost Friday with the return of Delmon Young from the DL. Before getting hurt, Young couldn't hit a beach ball with a broom, hitting only .228 with no home runs. Unlike Rolen above, Delmon poses a major buy low opportunity. First, he is just 25 and has posted a .290+ batting average in his 4+ years in the big leagues. Bottom line is the best is yet to come for Young. He will hit and hit a lot. The only question is whether the woeful Twins offense will drag him down.


Logan Morrison: Sticking with returns from the shelf, the Fish activated Logan Morrison in time for the game Friday. Prior to getting hurt LoMo was raking at a .327. Moreover, he had hit 4 HR already – doubling his 2010 total. Oh, and he hit number 5 last night – a very good sign indeed. Buy while you still can.


And last, but not least, Schultz says: "For every 100,000 words written about rotisserie baseball, 99,990 of them are about the players you should acquire, drop, trade and keep your eye on. Very rarely do we talk about the actual game of rotisserie baseball and the rules that govern them. No surprise there, David Foster Wallace was the only person that could make a dissertation on rules and the bureaucracy that creates them interesting and he found the IRS a more interesting topic than fantasy sports. Plus, every league has different rules, so a discussion on the topic can often have limited relevance. At a bare minimum, at the beginning of the season, every owner should have a legitimate chance to win and, over the course of the season, needs to know that they are being treated equally. Terrible league rules and/or a weak commissioner are fatal to a league's success, prompting unnecessary fights and an unmanageable turnover of owners. Fortunately, you have access to the mind of the greatest commissioner in the history of rotisserie baseball. Yes, Schultz is more than Glenn Colton's witty friend.

The injury to Kendrys Morales raises the interesting issue of how the failure to have proper rules in place can jeopardize the competitive balance. In redraft leagues, an injury to someone like Morales - a roto-gamechanging talent - is a nonissue, he can be cut and life goes on. What about keeper leagues? In auction leagues that are salary driven, this presents a perplexing conundrum. Releasing someone like Morales simply hands him to someone as a free agent who can keep him for 2012 at a bargain basement price. On the other hand, if you keep him to prevent some other team from netting a nice keeper, you're clogging up a roster spot that could be used to help you for this year or next. The easiest and quite possibly only fair way to address this situation is to institute a rule preventing players on the disabled list from being acquired as free agents. The goal of any auction league should be to get every player to market value as soon as possible. It may take 5 or 6 years for some players (think Albert Pujols coming out of nowhere to be the best hitter in baseball) but good foresight should be reasonably rewarded. Assuming Morales, or any player of his stature that suffers a year-ending injury, returns the next year, he goes back into the auction and goes for whatever the market will bear. No one gets a cheap bargain and no one gets stuck with the onus of being the sole protector of your league's integrity.

In a realistic sense, if you were counting on Morales, you've already addressed his absence over the first six weeks of the season. There's no need to rush and pick up Eric Hosmer (who is the real deal) or Mark Trumbo, although both would only be available if you play in an inattentive or slow-witted league.

One last thing, if you eliminate the first game of the season, after last night Fausto Carmona has a 2.56 ERA and a 1.03 WHIP while pitching for the team with the best record in the American League. Once you admit you were wrong about Carmona and the Indians, the incessant Tribe thumping will stop (or at least go down to a dull whoop). Until then, it's Tribe Time baby. It's Tribe Time. "


Response: Very interesting roto legalisms from the baron of the bottom of the page. I agree that in keeper leagues, injured players should not be FAAB-able. Should they be tradeable? I would argue no for the same reason, but it does illustrate the need to have a proper constitution in place. For those whose leagues don't, I highly recommend going to the Tout Wars site, www.toutwars.com, and checking out the constitution. It will give you a head start.

As to the Tribe, I just wonder whether Cleveland's favorite son is not spending enough time rooting against Lebron. Hex him will ya Schultzie?


Glenn Colton is co-host of Colton and the Wolfman on SiriusXM Tuesdays 8-11pm ET and a long-time fantasy sports player, author of numerous print and electronic media fantasy sports articles, and a participant in expert leagues, including baseball's LABR league and football's FTSA experts league. Colton and Rick Wolf have won the AL LABR Championship three times and football's FTSA experts league four times. Colton joined Wolf in the Fantasy Sports Trade Association Hall of Fame in June of 2013. He can be found on Twitter .



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