Chet Gresham

Targets and Touches

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Week 4 Target Watch – AFC

Thursday, September 27, 2012


Indianapolis Colts

 

Reggie Wayne: 18-7-15 (40), Donnie Avery: 8-10-9 (27), Coby Fleener: 10-4-2 (16), T.Y. Hilton: dnp-1-8 (9), Kris Adams: 4-3-1 (8), Dwayne Allen: 0-1-6 (7), Mewelde Moore: 1-2-1 (4), Donald Brown: 2-0-1 (3), Vick Ballard: 0-1-0 (1), Austin Collie: dnp-dnp-1 (1), LaVon Brazill: 1-dnp-0 (1)


Trying to figure out who the number two receiver for the Colts is has been a bit of a work in progress. Donnie Avery stepped up with Austin Collie out, but this week it was T.Y. Hilton. So let’s take a look at the snaps to see what we can see.


Avery was on the field for 79 plays, including 53 pass plays to Hilton’s 40 plays, including 34 pass plays. They both had a good chunk of targets, nine and eight respectively, but Hilton had the one big touchdown play.


With Austin out for the season, it pretty much comes down to Avery and Hilton. Hilton showed a lot in preseason, but Avery has proven himself as well this season. If the snaps stay the same, Avery should be the guy to own.


The tight end situation is getting cloudier by the day. Coby Fleener started the season with double digit targets, six receptions and 82 yards. It’s been all downhill from there.  Last week it was Dwayne Allen’s turn for targets and snaps. Allen was on the field for 60 plays, 30 of them passing, to Fleener’s 43, 22 of them passing.


Coming into the season I thought we would see something like this from the get-go, but when we didn’t I had to assume Fleener was going to be the guy. I think I made an ass out of you and somebody else who owns Fleener. It may be a knee-jerk reaction, but I like Allen more this preseason and I’m ready to switch them out.


Donald Brown is still the main running back in Colt land, so Vick Ballard’s value remains pretty non-existent. But Brown is not going to give you consistent production in this pass first offense. In the red zone the Colts are nearly the exact opposite of the Texans, passing 70% of the time.

 

 

Jacksonville Jaguars

 

Laurent Robinson: 9-6-1 (16), Justin Blackmon: 6-4-5 (15), Cecil Shorts: 7-2-2 (11), Maurice Jones-Drew: 5-3-2 (10), Mike Thomas: 1-3-3 (7), Greg Jones: 2-1-3 (6), Marcedes Lewis: 5-0-1 (6), Kevin Elliott: dnp-dnp-4 (4), Montell Owens: 3-0-0 (3), Zach Potter: 0-2-0 (2), Rashad Jennings: 1-dnp-dnp (1)


Much like last season, the passing offense of the Jaguars is a fantasy black hole.  Without Maurice Jones-Drew their offense would be similar or worse than Electric Football.

 

 

Kansas City Chiefs

 

Dwayne Bowe: 6-15-16 (37), Dexter McCluster: 10-5-4 (19), Tony Moeaki: 6-4-3 (13), Jamaal Charles: 0-4-8 (12), Jon Baldwin: 0-6-4 (10), Steve Breaston: 4-1-3 (8), Shaun Draughn: 2-2-3 (7), Peyton Hillis: 3-3-1 (7), Kevin Boss: 2-1-dnp (3)


Matt Cassel had 44 attempts, which is good for us target mavens who want to see the numbers in all their bloated glory. There of course wasn’t much of a question that Dwayne Bowe would lead the way, but after him, no other receiver stepped out as a target. Maybe that’s Cassel’s fault or the receivers, either way, if you can’t get more than four targets when your team is passing quite a bit, you aren’t going to be fantasy relevant too often.


Of course the huge news was the reemergence of Jamaal Charles, who touched the ball 39 times for 288 yards and a touchdown. Peyton Hillis on the other hand, twisted his ankle and Shaun Draughn took over backup duties. Any way you look at it, the job is Charles’ to lose.

 

 

Miami Dolphins

 

Brian Hartline: 8-12-9 (29), Davone Bess: 7-6-7 (20), Anthony Fasano: 5-3-10 (18), Reggie Bush: 6-4-1 (11), Anthony Armstrong: 3-dnp-6 (9), Daniel Thomas: 3-dnp-2 (5), Charles Clay: 1-3-0 (4), Legedu Naanee: 2-1-0 (3), Jorvorskie Lane: 1-0-1 (2)


The Dolphins lost Reggie Bush, their best offensive player, during the game and still almost beat the Jets with their backup ground attack. They pretty much had to the run the ball, because Tannehill couldn’t get anything going through the air.


With Bush out, Daniel Thomas saw the majority of the carries, but Lamar Miller also got into the action. The fact that Thomas had two targets and Miller had none is a crime against nature, but it is what it is. If Bush can’t play this week, we most likely will see a similar 2:1 ratio of work between these two.

 

 

New England Patriots

 

Brandon Lloyd: 8-13-12 (33), Wes Welker: 5-11-10 (26), Rob Gronkowski: 6-9-3 (18), Julian Edelman: 2-6-7 (15), Stevan Ridley: 3-4-1 (8), Aaron Hernandez: 7-1-dnp (8), Danny Woodhead: 0-1-2 (3), Deion Branch: dnp-dnp-3 (3), Kellen Winslow: dnp-dnp-2 (2), Michael Hoomanawanui: 0-0-1 (1)

 

If I were Bill Belichick I’d be embarrassed about the amount of work Stevan Ridley and Rob Gronkowski saw in week three. Of course I’m no offensive genius, but giving Scrappy Woodhead 52 snaps to Ridley’s 26 and Gronkowski three targets to Edelman’s seven, Branch’s three, Winslow’s two, etc… makes me wonder if he should have been upset with someone else rather than the refs after losing to the Ravens.


I bring this up because it’s pretty tough figuring out who he will showcase each week. I’m sure the cream will rise to the top and Ridley and Gronk will be right back to normal next week, but now there’s a little doubt as to whether Belichick is an evil genius or just evil.

 


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Chet Gresham writes Target Watch and The Morning After for Rotoworld.com and is the founder of The Fake Football. Chet can be found on Twitter .
Email :Chet Gresham



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